The Beauty of the Living Goddess in Kumari Ghar

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It was King Prithvi Narayan Shah who first in using the two-triangular flag when he succeeded in unifying all kingdoms in Nepal on 1768. Yes, two triangles on the Nepalese national flag represent two great dynasties which once existed in the Land of a Thousand Gods, namely the Shah Dynasty and the Rana Dynasty.

I found it everywhere.

Please, come!….Please, come!” a man told me to entering a shiny red brick building. European tourists and their tour guides who seem to know the reason why they come to this place seem to flock to entering the gate. I who haven’t saved any information, just rely on that man’s humble smile. A moment later I was inside.

The man in a gray jacket who was meritorious to brought me to the Goddess.

Another man inside greeted me, “Welcome to Kumari Ghar…The house of Kumari”. Kumari is a living goddess in Hindu and even Buddhist mythology. Kumari itself is a Sanskrit term which means “Princess”. Kumari is chosen by the head of Pandita and is considered the reincarnation of Goddess Taleju, the Goddess of Guardians of the City.

Chop up buffalo meat for tomorrow’s offering ceremony.

I kept eavesdropping on tour guide’s explanation to European travelers. It was said that the last king Malla often met in secret with Goddess Taleju who was asked to protect the kingdom. His wife who was suspicious, on a night followed the King when he was about to meet the Goddess. Suddenly the Goddess was angry because her whereabouts was revealed. But the Goddess was still kind enough to remain willing to protect the kingdom, but with one requirement, i.e by providing a girl as a reincarnation of her. Well, this girl was what I was going to see this time.

A side of 263 years old Kumari Ghar.

All eyes were on three black windows on top floor of Kumari Ghar. From there, Kumari will be displayed in a flash. The burly men seemed to be starting to spread out in all corners and their eyes were unblinking at us. Their faces swept across to all tourists in courtyard, they were careful to not to let any video highlights or camera captures pointed towards Kumari when it was shown later.

Curious to immediately see it.

The time came, everyone was silent as the window slowly opened. Kumari hadn’t come out yet, I didn’t blink for fearing of losing her appearance. Burly men below loudly shouted to other above, I didn’t know what they was reporting. Perhap condition were ready for Kumari to appeared in the window.

Two women rechecked condition below from above. A moment later, they gave a code to inside. An instant later, a beautiful girl who dressed in all red, crowned with gold sheets with a third eye on her forehead appeared in the window opening. Just a moment, less than half a minute.

Wooouwww“, a word which came out from all visitors and then they were busy whispering to their friends in their language. While I was still looking at the window which had been closed since earlier with a smile. It was crazy to be able to meet a goddess who was actually alive.

This is what Kumari looks like.

Following the belief, Kumari will finish being the reincarnation of Goddess Taleju when she is menstruating and will be replaced by a new Kumari. Kumari will be selected from three years old with very strict requirements such as no scars, no fear from masked men who dancing on the blood of slaughtered buffalo, she willn’t step on the ground as long as become Kumari and only come out just once a year, i.e in Bhoto Jatra ceremony, the festival to celebrating rainy season as well as harvest season.

This Nepali culture is magical….It’s amazing.

Madira at Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square

Early morning….No doubt, I exchanged 1.000 Rupee with a pink-white ticket as an access to enjoying the history of Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square.

Walking on andesite-covered Layaku Marg Street which looking gray color and the thin dust which thrown by the cleaning staff’s broomsticks, I was ready to entering ancient Nepal are which was still in the form of a kingdom.

The temple to worship “Goddess of Science” I passed passed and then I met a crowd of people who were busy burning incense, sowing flowers and then putting their palms together on their chests facing a black six-armed statue which was believed to be the embodiment of Lord Shiva the Destroyer.

Saraswati Temple.

Meanwhile, the incense traders in Indorapur Mandir courtyard made this area very crowded if was compared to other areas in Kathmandu Durbar Square. In harmony with a busyness of hundreds of pigeons were eating their breakfast which was given by travelers who have come first in this area.

Kaal Bhairav ​​with golden crown as embodiment of Lord Shiva.

Roof layers of all temples look the same and took me to Majapahit fiction atmosphere likely in Indonesian cinema. The atmosphere of Hindu Knights which was very thick that morning, was able to throw me for a moment from a world which was fanatical with technology.

Corn kernels were sold to pigeons.

The Royal Palace of Malla which was later used by Shah Dynasty was an important icon in Kathmandu Durbar Square. Because the statue of Lord Hanuman was guarded at front gate, this UNESCO World Heritage Site was known as Hanuman Dhoka Durbar Square. Some people call it as Basantapur Durbar Khsetra because this palace was located in Basantapur area.

That was the gate.

After gate, the spacious palace courtyard welcame. Known as Nasal Chowk. Nasal means dance, referring to Lord Shiva who danced Tandava Nataraja when destroying the obsolete universe. This plaza-like courtyard was surrounded by palace buildings on all four sides.

White building on west side of palace.

Meanwhile on south side of courtyard was a sign of a project funded by Ministry of Commerce of People’s Republic of China to renovated the palace which was badly damaged after a tectonic earthquake which was resulted from the collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates in the Himalayas in 2015.

The Nine-story Basantapur Tower which has collapsed.
The room in which there was a statue of Lord Shiva who was dancing.
Sun Dial, the timepiece before clock invention.

Then, on north side, there was the architectural form of Newar with striking green windows. Nicknamed as Sisha Baithak which its functions as a work audience room. On the lower floor of this building, there were rows of king photos. And two palace guards were seen pacing with their rifles around this building.

From left were King Rana Bahadur Shah (third King of Nepal) and his son King Girbanayuddha Bikram Shah (fourth King-pictured at right)
With Guard Police at Sisha Baithak before leaving the palace.

I left the palace while throwing my thanks and goodbye to Guard Police. Suddenly his friend who had just arrived said to him in Nepali, I guess it reads “Where is he from?”, because the policeman who I took the photo with said simply “Indonesia”.

One tip when you are in Kathmandu Durbar Square area is to try to understand one by one buildings which you pass, because every building there has an amazing function and historical value.

Again I found a unique building. A temple which studded with Shwet Bhairav ​​which was believed to be the most powerful embodiment of Lord Shiva. Hidden in wooden curtains and waiting for the Indrajatra Festival to fully reveal itself to the people of Newar. When the festival arrived, Madira (alcohol) will be emitted from his mouth as a form of blessing for humans.

Shwet Bhairav.

It was noon….The sun was now starting to penetrate every gap in the square, warming my body which had been exposed to the cold since morning. It was time to move on to next destination.

Next I would show you the beauty of a goddess in Hindu and Buddhist mythology in Nepal.

Yups….Follow me!

Indra Chowk before Kathmandu Durbar Square

Got ready for breakfast….

Unusually, a slightly luxurious breakfast had been prepared on the top floor of Shangrila Boutique Hotel. Fried rice sprinkled with diced buffalo meat, two slices of sausage and a sheet of beef eye egg. Two layers of toast with a sheet of cheese were also prepared. Then they closed with a cup of hot black coffee.

A full stomach and I was ready to enter the past Nepalese glory that will be implied in every inch of area in Kathmandu Durbar Square, one of three famous Durbar Square in Nepal. “Durbar” itself means “palace”. So actually Durbar Square is a palace square in general.

Walking in Amrit Marg, the warm morning sun eased my steps when I must defeat 9 degrees Celcius air which was still reluctant to move up. While coughing had inhabited my throat since a day ago due to dust which continued to be uncontrollably inhaled. “It’s okay, tomorrow I fly to New Delhi, surely air will be cleaner there,” I thought to calm myself. This belief kept Ambroxol tablets which I brought from Jakarta still intact.

Now I was starting to enter a number of narrow intricate turns. Andesite-floor streets lined with a row of sun-blocking shophouses and spreading of irregular signboards. Even in Jyatha Marg, it was decorated by the very tangled knotted strands of electric cables.

Nepalese electric officer must be adept at dealing with electrical damage.
Gemitir flower trader on the edge of Chandraman Singh Marg.

It was time to step out at last intersection before entering the famous Indra Chowk area. It was 10 a.m. but shops along Chandraman Singh Marg were still closed. Meanwhile, motorbikes which were passing could be counted in a matter of fingers.

Pedicabs which started their services.
Tasting boiled peanuts.

A few steps, the area which I headed for was in front of my eyes, intersection of five streets with very high activity. The rumble of morning trading which stunned me to observe it from a intersection side. This was Indra Chowk, an area which for centuries had been a famous trading center in Kathmandu district. Anyone who wanted to hunt for Nepalese clothes, souvenirs or tasting local food then just came here!

Pedicab base at Indra Chowk.

Entering intersection area from north side via Chandraman Singh Marg, I could see other four roads which made up the intersection, namely Siddhidas Marg (from Northeast), Watu Marg, Sukra Path, and Siddhidas Marg (from Southwest). All five lead to a broad circle with an iconic view of Aakash Bhairav ​​temple.

Aakash Bhairav yang bersejara The historic Aakash Bhairav ​​became Nepal’s first king’s palace.

Stepping back, away from the noise of Indra Chowk while holding Dhaka Topi which I bought from a shophouse, a less crowded street greeted me again.

Siddhidas Marg.

On this street, there was an interesting spot. Public knew it as Makhan Tole. A famous art spot in Kathmandu. There were many fine arts works here and of course many travelers chase them.

Makhan Tole Gate.

From Makhan Tole, it only took 5 minutes walking to Kathmandu Durbar Square.

Finally I arrived.

Let’s explore what were in Kathmandu Durbar Square …….

Bollywood Dance in Thamel

I was put in the first floor room to the right of Shangrila Boutiqe Hotel’s reception desk. Putting my 45 litre backpack and took my boots off, after some time, I let the warm water splash my tired body after almost half a day of hard journey in a road trip leaving Pokhara.

Not wanting to be trapped in boredom at my room, I started stepping red carpeted stairs to hotel’s roof. At above, a young man who standing at cash counter greeted and offered me a special restaurant menu. There wasn’t special menu which I ordered, I would just spend the evening with a cup of hot tea and enjoying the charm of Thamel area from above.

Shangrila Boutique Hotel restaurant.

Until my adventure desires teased. It felt like a loss if I didn’t move closer to the road and directly enjoying the atmosphere. Thamel was really special. Imagine, the streets were dedicated every night especially for their country’s guests. Each end of the road was guarded by police who wouldn’t allow motorized vehicles to passing through. Thamel was always crowded with travelers to spend the Kathmandu’s night.

I started out on the street.
Evening before dark.

Still dusty….I walked along the streets lined with pashmina outlets, souvenirs, restaurants, money changers, hotels or tourism agency offices on either side of it. Tips for you….If you aren’t interesting in buying pashmina, then don’t try to bid it, the seller will ask you to transact in their outlet and they are the best negotiators and I make sure that you will go out from their stall with carrying one of their wares.

Wallet’s teasers.
Typical colorful flags like on their shrine.

I had a little trouble in finding dinner menu because I purposely avoided a restaurant menu. I struggled to find a food stall for dinner. Exiting and entering some alleys until finally I found it, really far into the alley. Luckily, this food stall provided momo. To completing this Nepalese typical food, I ordered a small glass of honey lemon mixed with ginger slices which made me feel warm.

Nepalese momo.

Back on the street after almost an hour sitting at the food stall. Passing a different road, I stopped at an intersection and turned to the right. A crowd with music kicking off Chaksibari Marg. After approaching it, it turned out that a group of dancers were practicing Bollywood dance. It was also fun to directly see the dance.

They practiced for a film.

Getting colder, I left the crowd and headed straight for the hotel. But because of a tourist area, some bar waitress stopped my steps. Now a young man spoke to me and offering me to spend a warm evening at a bar. “You can enjoy our band performance“, he said. I who have never entered a bar in my life, starting to be tempted, “Okay, there’s nothing wrong to try“, I thought.

As a result, I started walking on the steps of Sisha Bar & Restaurant. It was true, a local band with 4 millennial youth members with 1 female vocalist was singing local pops which made me excited to sit down and enjoying the show. Until I drank two large portions of hot lemon with honey for enjoying the band show.

Beautiful and unforgettable evening in Thamel

Wrong Seat in Pokhara-Kathmandu Tourist Bus

Mr. Tirtha still accompanied me to speak, we leaned back in his tiny taxi while observing the bustle around Tourist Bus Park. Several hawkers took turn getting on and off in all small sized-buses offering their wares.

A while later, Mr. Tirtha widely spread his arms and we lightly hugged as a substitute for saying “thank you and see you later”. I entered a bus on half an hour before departure. It would be better because Mr. Tirtha could immediately continue work with his taxi.

The conductor showed me a seat where I should sit. At second row behind driver which was limited by a glass screen. Now situation became tense, when an Indian spouse argued with the conductor. They felt were aggrieved because a ticket agent in Kathmandu had promised them to giving them a front seat. The conductor casually snapped back, “This is Pokhara, Not Kathmandu”. Instantly situation was silence. I just realized, that spouse wanted my seat…. Hahaha, even though I was asked to exchange, I didn’t refuse either. Seriously.

Three European tourists in the front seat near driver had fun playing cards the whole way.

Three and a half hours after departure on 7 am, bus stopped for breakfast break for 20 minutes after an hour earlier, bus had once done 15 minutes of toilet break. Hotel’s breakfast which Mr. Raj prepared on the last morning seemed quite effective for me to didn’t spend any consumption budget this time. Come on!, let me showed you how the restaurant which I stopped at:

Buffet eating!
That was the cost.
The hat which used by the cashier was called as Dhaka Topi.
Yups, I still full….Just drank a coffee.

I felt hungry at lunch break on 1:30 p.m., enjoying a thali (Indian wide plate) of food which I picked up from buffet table for 400 Rupee and drink a free-orange juice which was given to all passengers since our  departure in Pokhara.

For free….
I got on the white one.

My watch pointed to 15:34 hours. The last toilet break was the most memorable part. Taking the time to explore area around the rest area. I moved towards a side of road and enjoyed panoramic view of valley and ravine below.

Most trucks in Nepal are Tata Motor.

Impressed with situation on a side of road, I entered a small alley and saw a glimpse of local residents activities who living on a side of road. Observing a banner which stucked in a concrete wall, I tried to slightly open an outer skin of Nepal’s politics.

Nepal is a parliamentary republic which has four main political parties. The Communist Party of Nepal (CPN) became the winning party in Nepal which placed two important figures, namely Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli as Prime Minister and Bidhya Devi Bhandari as President of the country.

That’s the symbol of CPN.

Back in bus seat, this time, my journey encountered a terrible traffic jam when it descended the last hill nearing Kathmandu border. Looked like a traffic jam in Cianjur on the weekend (Cianjur is tourist destination near my home).

The bus arrived in Kanti Path Road on 17:08 hours. Excessive fatigue persuaded me to immediately looked for Shangrila Boutique Hotel in Thamel area. I walked through many narrow alleys and asking to local people to find the location. Only walking for 20 minutes, I finally found the hotel.

I handed over 2.300 Rupee as the rate of staying per night. This time, I would spend 2 nights in Kathmandu to enjoy the city.

Himalayan Coffee and Nepali Thali

Before I really finished descending Anadu Hill, I stopped at a shop. A grocery store which sell some snacks, mineral waters, as well as soft alcoholic drinks. A small shop which spread smell of coffee aroma from the roasting stove at right.

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Somersby with 5% alkohol….Popular in Pokhara.

Himalayan coffee bean”, said the seller when I watched how he roasted coffees. For some people, passion is everything. Like this man, he was willing to released  his Japan citizenship and chose to be Nepalese for his love of Himalayan coffee.

I take it“, I pointed to 250 gram coffee package and bought it.

—- **** —-

Mr. Tirtha, your country is unique. Some Nepalese faces are like Indians, sometimes I find them similar to Chinese”, I said when Mr. Tirtha who began to step on gas pedal away from the hill.

Yess…. Nepal is flanked by India in south and China in north. So some Nepalese have mixed marriages”, he said with a friendly smile answering my question.

We moved northeast around Phewa Lake to bak to hotel which was 6 km away. Upon arrival at New Pokhara Lodge, I thanked to Mr. Tirtha who had been accompanying me since 4 am in my Pokhara exploration. I handed over 5.000 Rupee as service fee, that means I only needed to spend a transportation budget of 1.600 Rupee because I used this taxi with other three backpacker who staying in the same hotel.

Having not lost the feel of New Years celebration on Lakeside Road, I returned to explore the outskirts of Phewa Lake after bathing and stretching my legs. This time, I was starving and had to dinner. There was still promise in myself after whole day conversation with Mr. Tirtha. Yes… .I would taste Nepali Thali.

Street foods seem not to be able to dampen my hunger, I rushed into a restaurant. I sat on its inside to get warm air, then greeted by a sweet female servant. It didn’t take long to choose. “Nepali Vegetarian Thali and Orange Juice“, I told to her after seeing the menu which I was reading. Nepalese food for 300 Rupee and juice for 150 Rupee to close my day that night.

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@Bellas Garden Restaurant.

—-****—-

The evening turned to morning, I sipped hot tea and finished the breakfast menu in hotel courtyard. Then returned to the room and shouldered my blue backpack to get ready to say goodbye to Mr. Raj. I shook his wrinkled hand and repeatedly patted his upper arm.

Me: “Thank you Mr. Raj for your kindness and hope to see you again next time ”.

Mr. Raj: “Be careful, Donny. Thank you for stopping by in New Pokhara Lodge ”.

I know Mr. Raj was still forcing himself to work because his last son is still studying at Kathmandu University. Because of his work, he still looked fit.

This time, Mr. Tirtha came for the last time to give me a taxi service. We both headed for Tourist Bus Park, the bus would take me to Kathmandu.

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Can you look more elegant…. Hufft, Donny!

Ponytail at Shanti Stupa

 “Preparing your leg to climb Anadu Hill!“, Said Mr. Tirtha while clenching his right fist forward.

Yes I knew. At the end of that time, I had to conquer hundreds of steps to enjoying the beauty of 47 years old pagoda, one of eighty pagodas of peace which scattered all over earth.

Riding northwest, the tiny taxi engine grunted nearly 20 minutes to complete 3.5km journey. Arriving at parking area, Mr. Tirtha showed me where to started climbing.

It took a long time to conquer all stairs. Gasping….I leaned against a railing for a moment on the way. Slowly drinking my remaining mineral water, I took a break while enjoying the beautiful faces of Nepalese girls who kept passing by. Nepalese girls were slender who love to have long black hair, brown skin and a face which is typical of South Asia. It would be lucky if you find the slanted eyes….beautifully authentic….Ouch.

Like lightning, I stuttered when a Nipon girl passed me and smiled while saying a short “Hi“. Automatically my lips smile at her while watching her closely. I was still stunned as she climbed further and further away. “Who and Why?“, I kept asking myself.

Oh, my gosh…..That ponytail beauty with the surname Kawaguchi who sat on my left on Thai Airways flight TG 319“, my memory snapped my reverie. She had disappeared around the corner. I was determined to look upstairs later.

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The statue made on November 5, 2001.

Starting to enter a large courtyard and were greeted by a statue of Mr. Meen Bahadur Gurung, Deputy Minister of Defense of Nepal who was instrumental in developing the stupa.Path to stupa.

The path to stupa.

World Peace Pagoda is known by another name as Shanti Stupa. Shanti is Sanskrit which means peace. So basically this is a peace monument which builts in the form of a stupa. This stupa was built by a Buddhist order from Japan who named as Nipponzan-Myohoji.

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Standing at an altitude of 1110 m above sea level.
The room behind the stupa.

The front court was silent, there was only one kind of hum sounded by a monk in a room. Silent and sacred. Meanwhile, on the far side was the southern edge of Phewa Lake and Himalayan indentation, which was extraordinarily attractive.

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Pokhara from the top of hill.
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Phewa Lake and the Himalayas…. Pokhara assets.

My heart stopped when a red helicopter suddenly took a sharp dive into the lake. This was the first time I saw a helicopter fall and sharply hit it.

My breath suddenly stopped, but finally able to quickly suck the air back when helicopter was able to align its muzzle with lake surface. Damn…. It was just a paid adrenaline game, of course visitors around me were ignoring it….Oh, Donny.

The liar helicopter.

My eyes searched all directions looking for Kawaguchi’s whereabouts. Pounding hope to find her. 15 minutes already….. I haven’t even seen her.. Maybe she had rushed back, I was lost the opportunity to apologize because I didn’t remember it well….

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A fake smile behind my disappointment.

It was late afternoon, time to go back to hotel.

L See the situation of Shanti Stupa here: https://youtu.be/wSOfTsqJjX8

Peeking a Devi’s Fall at Gupteshwor Mahadev Cave

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Horn sound made me see to left when I just walked out of a noodle food stall in Tashiling. Yes, that shrill sound came from Mr. Tirtha’s taxi which I never knew since when it had been parked under a tree right out of Tashiling area.

I think we don’t need to go to Devi’s Fall because its water discharge is low now. So you can see the beauty of Devi’s Fall from a cave”, said Mr. Tirtha while turning steering wheel to left and entered Shital Path Street. I just agreed with that information.

Devi’s Fall often had been nicknamed as David’s Fall since decades ago when a Swiss drowned in current at this waterfall.

OK …. We are arriving“, joked Mr. Tirtha while snapping her fingers when he had just turned right following Siddhartha Rajmag’s Street flow.

I started to enter the gate of Gupteshwor Mahadev Cave, which at its top stood the dashing Lord Shiva holding his trident in cross-legged position. Through it, then walking in tarpaulin-covered entrance route with a row of souvenir stalls on either side. Then I was greeted by the presence of Lord Vishnu statue which sleeping next to the main building.

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Main balcony.

It was time to head to a concrete balcony to bought a ticket for 100 Rupee. Before descending the stairs to cave mouth, for a moment I paid attention to details of staircase walls which were regularly spaced displaying Gods carvings which might implicitly feature a certain stories.

Stairs to cave mouth.

Temperature difference had begun to be felt on first foothold at cave mouth. Now I was ready to explore the longest cave in Nepal.

Cow Shed“, I was stunned to see a cow shed with blue iron fence. I asked a local person who was talking in front of it. He briefly said that this cow protected Lord Shiva. I nodded as if I understood.

Going down the stairs through right side of cage I felt my breath getting heavier. The damp dark cramped space made it so. Then I saw a bright light again at a temple which dedicated to glorifying Lord Shiva.

It was said that this cave was found in 16th century with cave mouth closed by grass. Local people named this cave as Bhalu Dulo. When found, there were already carvings of several Hindu Gods such as Mahadev, Parvati, Nageshwor and Saraswati.

Now stairs to cave bottom were getting sharper and slippery. Water continued to drip from stalactites which were spread evenly on cave roof. The lack of lighting made my downward journey very slow.

Be careful, ok…..

Finally, the appearance of cave bottom was amazing. A very large room was in basement. Then on a side appeared a natural gap which was the only hole to enjoy the beauty of Devi’s Fall.

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That was Devi’s Fall…. Wasn’t that cool ?.

Check out the situation of Gupteshwor Mahadev Cave here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7p0Yjhocidg

God’s extraordinary work of nature….

A Bowl of Noodle in Tashiling Tibetan Refugee Camp

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I already understood before Mr. Tirtha told me that my next destination was Tashiling, A Tibetan refugee settlement in Pokhara. Nepal itself provided access to this migration because since ancient times, Tibet and Nepal have had close close relations in economy, diplomacy and culture. They have repeatedly signed various cooperation agreements in their history as two mutually sovereign nations.

Departing from International Mountain Museum, my taxi drove towards east and it was about 3.5 km in distance. This time Mr. Tirtha who changed to interrupt the trip, he stopped at a pharmacy to buy a some drugs. He steadfastly said that his father had a liver problem which required him to set aside his income from driving a taxi for his father’s treatment.

Namaska“, he shouted at his friends on the street. He explained a little to me that Namaska ​​was a greeting similar to “Namaste“.

Then, he emphasized that tourism was like a gold for his country. So many people in his age struggled to have a small car and fuctioned as a taxi. And English was the key for them to attract tourists …. “Sorry Mr Tirtha, if in Jakarta, I prefer to be a salesman with a commission” …..Hahaha, he broadly laughed.

15 minutes later, the taxi exited from Siddhartha Rajmarg main road. Stop on a dirt road. “Welcome to Tashiling“, said Mr. Tirtha.

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The view of Tashiling from dropping point.

My steps were immediately drawn to a row of souvenir stalls. Yesss…. That was where Tibetan people earn money to survive in their refugee camps. On the way home, Mr. Tirtha regretted Tibetan migration because China has paid more attention to Tibet welfare now.

A man who was so friendly explained some various meanings of  merchandises.

Entering this 56 year old village, I could get a peek at a little Tibetan culture. The way they dress and worship was an easy thing to grasp during this brief visitation. The hospitality of the tiny residents with brown skin and slanted eyes became something unforgettable. According to a confession from one of them, there were about 700 Tibetan refugees in this village. Even in the early days of their migration, there were about 2,000 residents.

Tashiling itself was only one of 12 refugee camps across Nepal. It was well known since Dalai Lama resistance, many Tibetans migrated to Nepal on 1959-1961.

Satisfied in seeing Tashiling’s face, I took time to sit at their small restaurant. I ordered a bowl of noodles for lunch. Simple menu for 150 Rupee which made me ready to continue the journey to next destination.

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It was delicious….Was there pork oil in?….Hahaha.

Come on, go to next destination….

Next Story—->

Sadness at International Mountain Museum

<—-Previous Story

Mr. Raj nicely prepared a special dish for me. Two bull’s-eye eggs served together with a banana, two layers of toast covered with mango jam and a cup of hot Nepalese tea. While Mr. Tirtha seemed to say goodbye and went home to enjoy his breakfast which made by his wife in his own home and then he would come back to pick me up and go around Pokhara until afternoon.

Precisely on 11 o’clock, he came. Then we were joking for a moment in lobby while waiting for another trio backpackers to appear. One thing that I kept from our conversation last morning that I had to try a Nepalese typical culinary called Nepali Thali.

Yups, time to explored….

This 3 km trip to southeast was only interrupted once when Mr. Tirtha stopped and waiting for me to exchange dollars at a small money changer at Phewa Lake edge.

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15 minutes later, I arrived.

I started to enter a courtyard with a sandy ground base. Dust spread in all directions when cars passed by. Then at a ticket counter in the form of a small stone-patterned building, I got an entrance ticket for 450 Rupee.

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Taking the queue….

It was necessary to pass a special pedestrian path to reach museum’s main building. The path was lined by a row of towering trees but not so shady.

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Let’s walked.

Arriving at front courtyard, a small monument welcomed me. A monument dedicated to Himalayan climbers who never descended again because they had their souls resided in a blanket of Himalayan snow.

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They were called mountaineers.
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The Museum.

Stepping stairs to reached museum front gate, then I was greeted by a simple x-ray gate. In early hallways, museum displayed photographs of world’s iceberg peaks. Also displayed the typical clothes of countries concerned.

Slovenia with several icebergs, namely Triglav (2,864 m asl), Stol (2,236 m asl), Prisojnik (2,547 m asl) and Porezen (1,630 m asl) along with Gorenjska clothes.

Entering next corridor, the museum introduced ethnic diversity throughout Nepal. The tribe name and its distinctive clothes were nicely displayed. It should be noted that this country, which covering no more than 8% of the land area of ​​the Republic of Indonesia, had 126 ethnicities in it.

Description: D:BC ReportsFoto and VideoGo Abroad15. NepalIMG_20180101_144106128_HDR.jpg
Etnis Thakali darEthnic Thakali from Mustang District, Zona Dhaulagiri.

Entering central hall, museum displayed names of Himalayas peaks. The Himalayas alone provide 18 main peaks which challenge hikers from all over the world to climb them.

Description: D:BC ReportsFoto and VideoGo Abroad15. NepalIMG_20180101_144414344_HDR.jpg
Makalu peaks (8,464 m asl) and Lhotse (8,516 m asl).

Finally, at the end, the museum presented heroic stories of the Himalayas conquest by first-class climbers. In this section also described a number of tragedies which they have experienced with their various climbing missions. Very touching and heart wrenching.

Visitation in this museum was ended by walking along second floor towards museum exit gate. Here was a destinations in Pokhara which were eye-opening about Nepal and the Himalayas.

Please stop by if you visit Pokhara.

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